I like DC characters; I just hate DC

I'm Amy, a white queer atheist vegetarian cis female physics major. I spend most of my time fangirling Connor Hawke, Jason Todd and Cassandra Cain. This blog is sex-positive, body positive, QUILTBAG positive, anti-racism, anti-misogyny, anti-ableism, anti-oppression in general, anti-whatever fuckery DC is pulling now, and pro-Missing-E. Check out http://daggerpen.livejournal.com/tag/fanfiction for my fics. I have SPD and a migraine disorder, so please tag for flashing lights, general trigger warnings, and, just as a personal "I'm tired of seeing scans from these shitty arcs" thing, tag for Fabian Nicieza and Grant Morrison, as well as the issue numbers of the arcs in which they both butchered Jason's characterization.
I am likewise willing to tag for anything. I do my best to tag for anything that might generally be a problem for someone, but if I'm posting something you need to Savior, just drop me an ask and I'll do my best. Thanks to Tumblr user dimethyloctopus for the icon. Check out the full version here: http://dimethyloctopus.tumblr.com/post/48569979761/cass-cain-redesign-kinda
Posts tagged "astronomy"

aljazeeraamerica:

Astronomers discover echoes of Big Bang expansion

Astronomers announced Monday that they had discovered what many consider the holy grail of their field — ripples in the fabric of space-time that are echoes of the massive expansion of the universe that took place just after the Big Bang.

Researchers say this is evidence that a split-second after the Big Bang, the newly formed universe ballooned out at a pace so astonishing that it left behind ripples in the fabric of the cosmos. The ripples, called gravitational waves, were predicted by Albert Einstein nearly a century ago.

Continue reading

(Photo: Keith Vanderlinde/Handout/Reuters)

rhamphotheca:

Strange Signal From Galactic Center Is Looking More and More Like Dark Matter

by Adam Mann

The more that scientists stare at it, the more a strange signal from the center of the Milky Way galaxy appears to be the result of dark matter annihilation. If confirmed, it would be the first direct evidence for dark matter ever seen.

Dark matter is a mysterious, invisible substance making up roughly 85 percent of all matter in the universe. It floats throughout our galaxy, but is more concentrated at its center. There, a dark matter particle can meet another dark matter particle flying through space. If they crash into one another, they will annihilate each other (dark matter is its own antiparticle) and give off gamma rays.

To search for a dark matter signal, astronomers use NASA’s Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope to map the gamma radiation throughout the galaxy. Then, they try to account for all known sources of light within this map. They plot the location of gas and dust that could be emitting radiation and subtract that signal from their gamma-ray map. Then they determine where all the stars are and subtract out that light, and so on for every object that might be emitting radiation. Once all those sources are gone, there remains a tiny excess of gamma radiation in the data that no known process can account for…

Continue reading @ Wired Science

Image: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration

(via ruckawriter)

pyrrhiccomedy:


Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.
Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.
So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)
Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.
This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 
Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?
By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.
Sources: 1 2 3

pyrrhiccomedy:

Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.

Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.

So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)

Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.

This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 

Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?

By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.

Sources: 1 2 3

scienceyoucanlove:

infinity-imagined:

The gravitational orbit of any body forms a helix, when you view them traveling through a time dimension.  A 3-dimensional helix is a ‘slice’ of the 4-dimensional shape of the orbit of a planet; X is a time dimension, Y and Z are space dimensions.  One 2D slice of a 3D helix is a circle, another is a wave.  One 3D slice of a 4D helix is a sphere; a planet in a specific moment of time.

Interesting patterns are revealed when you start thinking about the 4-dimensional shapes of objects through time.  One example I enjoy is the fractal nature of gravitational orbits.  Consider the 4D shape of the orbit of the Moon around the Earth through time; a helix.  The helix of the Moons orbit is ‘wrapped’ around the helical orbit of the Earth around the Sun.  The helices of the Earth and Moon are further ‘wrapped’ around the orbit of the Sun around the center of our Galaxy.  When Galaxies orbit each other another iteration is possible.  Because gravity causes the same behavior at different physical scales, a fractal pattern is generated.  Viewed from the ‘side’, with one space and one time dimension, orbits are fractal waves.  Viewed from the ‘top’ (two space dimensions) they are fractal circles.  A 3D slice in spacetime (XYZ) shows a helical fractal. The true 4D object is a fractal hyperhelix.

Another beautiful fractal in time is biology.  Every time a cell divides it creates a bifurcation or a ‘branch’.  The same thing happens whenever an organism reproduces, or at each speciation event.  All life is part of the same 4-dimensional fractal tree, extending back in time to the moment of abiogenesis.  When you consider your 4-dimensional shape it becomes clear that we are all part of the same fractal organism, wrapped on the spherical surface of a hyperhelix!

I have a difficult time explaining this concept, if you don’t understand it’s because I’m not doing a good enough job explaining.  I can see it perfectly in my mind, and I wish I could create visuals to show exactly what I mean.  If there are any visual artists (paper or CG) who understand and would like to help spread this concept, please contact me.  The same goes for any mathematicians who can clarify any of this!

Trippy

(via blackgoliath)

the-science-llama:

Super Moon
— June 23, 2013

Be sure to look out for the Moon these next few months as it approaches Perigee, because the full moons during these times will appear exceptionally large. The Moon will be at its Perigee, or closest approach, in July 23 and it will reach full moon only a few minutes after it passes this point in its orbit.

These ‘super moons’ not only appear larger because they are physically closer but, combined with a full moon, the mind can play tricks on you to think they are much larger. This phenomena is called the Moon Illusion. Try to catch these full moons as they rise/set because the illusion works when there is an object in the foreground, like a tree, building or mountains.

Stargazing Events for 2013

(via blackgoliath)

spaceplasma:

NASA Probe Gets Close Views of Large Saturn Hurricane

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has provided scientists the first close-up, visible-light views of a behemoth hurricane swirling around Saturn’s north pole.

read more...

(via 1theblacksupremacist-deac)

geofaultline:

jtotheizzoe:

What would happen if an meteor or asteroid the size of ______________, made of ______________, hit Earth at a speed of ______________? 

There’s a web app for that. Check out Purdue’s Impact: Earth!

Have fun destroying the planet!!! (And learning about asteroid impacts of various sizes and energies, of course)

This is way cool!!

Simultaneously fascinating, terrifying, and perhaps a little buggy.

"The Earth is strongly disturbed by the impact, but loses little mass.

Depending on the direction and location the collision, the impact may make a noticeable change in the tilt of Earth’s axis (< 5 degrees).

Depending on the direction and location of impact, the collision may cause a change in the length of the day of up to 303 hours.

The impact does not shift the Earth’s orbit noticeably.”

"Global Damages: Day change: not significant.”

(via burritosong)

ruckawriter:

Wired Science Space Photo of the Day - Galactic Pinwheel 120,000 light years across. Pretty photo of a ring galaxy.

saucertime:

On December 3rd 2012, Mercury , Venus and Saturn will align in the northeast over the pyramids in Giza. This particular alignment over the spacing of the pyramids is very rare. This won’t happen again for another 2,000 years. 

Most astronomers will probably say this event is just a coincidence, but given the evidence of ancient Egypt’s impact in history, I keep an open mind. This could be a phenomena lost with an ancient civilization that seemed to have known a few things about the universe that we have yet to understand… 

(via annnica)